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Posts Tagged ‘Patrick Brosseau’

Batman Incorporated (2012) #1

July 31, 2012 Leave a comment

June 10, 2012

Title: Leviathan Part One: Demon Star

Writer: Grant Morrison
Art:
Chris Burnham
Letters:
Patrick Brosseau
Colors:
Nathan Fairbairn
Cover Art:
Chris Burnham
Editor:
Mike Marts
Publisher:
DC Comics

Returning for what promises to be the finale of his Batman run, Grant Morrison kicks off the second volume of Batman Incorporated with a pretty startling story. Talia Head’s Leviathan is growing in power, attacking on several fronts, targeting members of Batman, Inc. and bringing the conflict straight to the doorstep of the Dark Knight.

This issue is surprising on several fronts. Morrison has wasted absolutely no time getting into the heat of the moment, starting us in the midst of the action with several attacks already executed and several battles already over and done. The energy here is about as high as it’s ever been during Morrison’s tenure with the Bat.

This is a New 52 title, but aside from a few cosmetic changes it doesn’t appear that Morrison has been forced to make too many concessions for the sake of setting it in the changed world. Bruce and Damian are still Batman and Robin, Dick was Batman for a time in the not-too-distant past, and the assorted members of Batman, Inc. are virtually untouched… even Batwing, who now stars in his own solo title. This is basically a good thing. Morrison had quite a momentum built up, and the lapse since the previous Leviathan Strikes one-shot may actually have served to help keep the pace brisk. The differences in the New 52 have all been suitably explored in the other titles and there’s no pressure to do so here.

Chris Burnham came into the previous series rather late in the game, but he’s making it is how. His style is influenced somewhat by frequent Morrison collaborator Frank Quitely, but not so much as to deem him a copycat. He’s drawing a classic Batman and a strong Damian, with the more monstrous characters depicted in a fashion that feels very consistent with what’s been done in the past.

The end of this issue, of course, is the real shocker, and if it were anybody but Morrison behind the wheel I’d be virtually certain there’s a stunt in the works to reverse what we seem to see on the last page. There still could be, of course, Morrison could be playing his own game, but from him it does feel more organic and less forced than it would be in many titles.

All in all, this issue stands as a fine beginning to a final act.

Rating: 8/10

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Justice League (2011 Series) #1

September 5, 2011 Leave a comment

September 4, 2011

Title: Justice League Part One

Writer: Geoff Johns
Pencils:
Jim Lee
Inks:
Scott Williams
Colorist:
Alex Sinclair
Letterer:
Patrick Brosseau
Cover Artist:
Jim Lee
Editor:
Eddie Berganza
Publisher:
DC Comics

The new DC Universe begins here! Five years in the past, the world has recently experienced the unveiling of its first public superhero, Superman. Suddenly, superhumans are crawling out of the woodwork, and Hal Jordan – Green Lantern of Space Sector 2814 – is summoned to Gotham City to hunt for an alien threat. He winds up encountering the mysterious figure known as the Batman, and together they begin the hunt for an alien that flees with an ominous cry… “For Darkseid!”

What we get here is great. The interaction between Batman and Green Lantern really feels fresh and new, while still being true to character. The scene where Hal realizes Batman doesn’t actually have any powers is really funny as well. It’s easy to read and accept this story as the first encounter of the greatest heroes of the DC Universe.

The problem with this issue is in the case of what we don’t get: namely, “enough.” It’s the first issue of an all-new Justice League and, in fact, the beginning of a whole new era for DC Comics, but all we really see here are Batman and Green Lantern. Sure, there’s a Superman cameo, and there’s a minor B-plot involving the boy we all know will become Cyborg, but there’s not a sense of scale here yet. If this had been an issue of Brave and the Bold it would have worked just as well. It seems like Johns could have tried to work in at least small moments for the other members of the team, something to give us a sense that they’re all coming together (like we know they are) instead of this merely being a chance encounter between two heroes.

It’s hard to believe Jim Lee has been turning out such great work for such a long time, but that’s certainly the case here. The book looks fantastic. I’ve always liked his rendition of Batman, and he does a very good Green Lantern as well. The last page of this book is the first time I’ve seen Superman in his new armor where it doesn’t really look out of place, and I hope other artists follow his lead.

I did like this issue, and I liked it quite a lot, but it felt like it was missing a little bit. I’m sure the next few issues will change all of that.

Rating: 7/10

Batman and Robin #25

August 25, 2011 Leave a comment

August 13, 2011

Title: The Streets Run Red Part 3: Boys’ Night Out

Writer: Judd Winick
Art:
Greg Tocchini & Andy Smith
Colorist:
Artur Fujita
Letterer:
Patrick Brosseau
Cover Artist:
Guillem March
Editor:
Mike Marts
Publisher:
DC Comics

Red Hood’s twisted partner, Scarlet, has been captured and held hostage by someone with a grudge against Jason Todd. As he comes to the rescue, though, he’s got two unwilling partners by his side – Batman and Robin.

Judd Winick, the writer who brought Jason back from the dead and has probably done most of the work with the character since then, finishes off this three-issue story by contrasting Jason and Dick Grayson, Batman. It’s a fair enough point of contrast – Jason harbors a deep hatred for Dick that is understandable, if not justifiable. And the end of this story places Jason in an interesting place – he’s certainly not part of the Batman “family” anymore, but he can’t entirely separate himself from them either. The unfortunate thing is that the book really doesn’t have anything terribly new to say about any of the characters involved, and in fact, sets up a status quo for Jason that it seems will be negated by the time his new Red Hood and the Outlaws title launches in the new DC Universe in September. (It feels kind of unfair to judge these books in view of a relaunch that hasn’t happened yet, but it’s also practically impossible not to do so.)

The book has its moments, but not really enough of them to make it an easy recommendation.

Rating: 7/10