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Archive for the ‘Johnny DC’ Category

Young Justice (2011 Series) #10

July 3, 2012 Leave a comment

June 5, 2012

Title: Hot Case

Writer: Kevin Hopps, Greg Weisman
Pencils:
Christopher A. Jones
Inks:
Dan Davis
Letters:
Dezi Sienty
Colors:
Zac Atkinson
Cover Art:
Christopher Jones & Carrie Strachan
Editor:
Jim Chadwick
Publisher:
DC Comics

Last issue, as the Young Justice kids got a little antsy with their lessons in espionage, Captain Atom decided to give them a practical assignment: prove the innocence of late Air Force officer Nathanial Adam, convicted of murder during the Vietnam era. This issue, the kids have tracked down some of the people involved in the case, only to find them being murdered one at a time. As they face a foe with a sword that can cut even Superboy, the team has to wonder just what they’ve stumbled into.

This has been a strong two-parter. It’s nice to see the team sent out on a different sort of case, a chance for Robin’s detective skills and Miss Martian’s stealth abilities to really come into play. The story is hurt slightly with familiarity – there’s a reveal at the end that isn’t a reveal at all if you’re familiar with the characters in the comic books, and probably isn’t that big a shock even if you have no idea who Captain Atom is and never read a story with him in it before. Building it like a mystery feels a little anti-climactic.

Christopher Jones does a good job of keeping the characters on-model with the TV show while, at the same time, providing strong, dynamic pages that hold up compared to any other superhero comic on the market. This book exists in-between episodes of the cartoon show, but the creators have done a good job of telling original stories that explore the characters without feeling like they’re just marking time until the next episode begins.

Rating: 8/10

Tiny Titans #45

January 28, 2012 Leave a comment

November 6, 2011

Title: Batgirl! Batgirls!

Writers: Art Baltazar & Franco
Art:
Art Baltazar
Cover Artist:
Art Baltazar
Editor:
Kristy Quinn
Publisher:
DC Comics/Johnny DC

In the batcave, Barbara finds a stash of Batgirl costumes and decides to have a little party. It’s Batgirl, Batgirl, Batgirl and Batgirl in “Batgirl! Batgirls!” As the Batgirls start to run rampant, Robin rounds up a few Robins of his own. Also: the Secret Six. Once again, the team behind Tiny Titans produces one of the most entertaining comics on the shelf. The book is sharp and wonderfully referential, bringing in tidbits and commentary about a lot of what’s gone on in the DC Universe(s) in the last few years. As with all great parodies, though, this is done with a very loving touch, presenting the characters in a way that’s really funny, but still making clever quips that will work just fine for older readers. The younger readers, fortunately, won’t notice anything and will still enjoy the book as a simple kids’ comic. The fact that they can bring in the Secret Six, probably the least kid-friendly DCU comic of the last decade, and still make it work so well is a fine testament to the talents of Art Baltazar and Franco. This is the best comic out there for kids, and fortunately, there’s plenty for their parents to enjoy as well.

Rating: 8/10

Batman: The Brave and the Bold #12

December 23, 2011 Leave a comment

December 23, 2009

Batman: The Brave and the Bold #12 (DC Comics/Johnny DC)
By Landry Q. Walker & Eric Jones

Batman is looking forward to a nice, relaxing Christmas of busting the Calendar Man in comission of his latest goofy plot, but the destruction of the world has a way of ruining a hero’s yuletide plans. Batman is whisked away from Earth to Rann where he has to join forces with Adam Strange to save not just Earth, but the entire universe from a mad Psion. Walker and Jones have, as usual, put together a highly entertaining comic. The story and art are sharp, they’ve got some of the most entertaining sound effects I’ve ever seen, and the climax of the story is rather surprising. They manage to work in a rather unusual Christmas twist that works pretty well in the context of the “Brave and the Bold” universe. This issue was an awful lot of fun.
Rating: 8/10

Super Friends (2008 Series) #20

October 31, 2011 Leave a comment

October 17, 2009

Super Friends #20 (DC Comics/Johnny DC)
By Sholly Fisch & Dario Brizuela

It’s Halloween, and the Super Friends are called out to take place in a parade. The fun is disrupted, though, when the scientist who called them directs them to a menace that’s out to ruin the fun — the Shaggy Man. Super Friends, of course, is a book for younger readers, and the content here works pretty well for that audience. Shaggy Man isn’t nearly the enemy he is in the mainstream JLA book, of course, and the ending is a tad anticlimactic, but the story is solid enough. Dario Brizuela stays on-model with the toy line fairly well, but I’m not a fan of his Wonder Woman at all. I don’t have the toy itself for reference, but just taken on her own, she looks entirely too bulky and solid, with very little femininity. I’m not suggesting that the kid’s version of the character be sexed up, of course, but there’s certainly a middle ground. For the little ones, this book is fine.
Rating: 6/10

Tiny Titans #42

August 14, 2011 Leave a comment

August 1, 2011

Title: Young Bizarros in Love

Writers: Art Baltazar & Franco
Art:
Art Baltazar
Editor:
Kristy Quinn          
Publisher:
DC Comics/Johnny DC

Supergirl’s imperfect duplicate Bizarrogirl has come to Earth. This being Tiny Titans, though, rather than coming to blows, Supergirl invites her to a pancake breakfast. Also there is Superboy’s duplicate, Match… and it’s love at first sight. Now in the real DC Universe, this would invite all kinds of uncomfortable, squicky questions about genetics, cloning, and Bizarros, but in the world of Tiny Titans we just move right on to Beast Boy’s fruitless pursuit of Terra. It’s an all-love issue, and it’s really funny. Art Baltazar and Franco have really mastered the light, gentle comedy of this title, creating something that’s got enough wit and cleverness to appeal to the adults, while still maintaining its entertainment value for the intended audience of much younger readers. This is one of the strangest spotlights they’ve done yet, and they sell it really well. This is the best comic being published for the beginning reader, and if you’ve got a kid that’s trying to learn (and that you’d like to get into comics) you need to swarm on it right now.

Rating: 8/10

Looney Tunes (1994 Series) #200

July 29, 2011 Leave a comment

July 13, 2011

Title: Hole in Wonderful; Soccer Blocker; Tee For Two

Writers: Bill Manthey, Sam Agro
Pencils:
Walter Carzon, David Alvarez, Pablo Zamboni
Inks:
Horacio Ottolini, Mike DeCarlo
Colorist:
Heroic Age, David Tanguay
Letterer:
Dezi Sienty, Ryan Cline, Mike Sellers
Cover:
Scott Gross
Editors:
Chynna Clugston-Flores, Joan Hilty, Rachel Gluckstern
Publisher:
DC Comics/Johnny DC

As much as I love the classic Looney Tunes characters, I don’t often buy the comic book. Their particular brand of insanity is really difficult to capture in comic book form, so I only get it when I have a specific reason to. Issue #200 of the current series, I thought, would be a good reason. Unfortunately, while the comics I got was perfectly acceptable as an issue of Looney Tunes, it wasn’t really anything special enough to mark such an anniversary.

Instead, we got what appears to be an all-sports issue, beginning with “Hole in Wonderful.” Here, we see Bugs Bunny wrapped up in a golf match with his Scottish nemesis, McTavish. Although the Scots invented golf, they didn’t have to deal with Bugs. His idea of miniature golf includes the use of pool bumpers, baseball pitching machines, and drag racers, leaving poor McTavish worn to the nub.

In “Soccer Blocker,” a group of Bugs’ more monstrous foes – including Witch Hazel and Gossamer – lure him into a trap with the promise of an international soccer festival. From here, things are predictable enough – Bugs winds up playing his part to the hilt, pitting the villains against one another while he waltzes to victory. This is probably the strongest story in the book, and the one that most completely captures the feeling of the cartoons. It’s always fun to see Bugs outwitting his foes, especially when he gets to use goofy disguises and maximum frustration.

The book returns to golf in the final story, “Tee For Two.” This time out, it’s Foghorn Leghorn who gets the spotlight. Foghorn has constructed his own backyard golf course, but when he tees off, he finds himself caught in one trap after another (and these traps are more of the “booby” variety, not the expected water traps.) This one isn’t bad – it plays with the old Foghorn Leghorn formula, but not in a way that’s disrespectful or untrue to the character.

If I was picking up this comic because I wanted sports-themed cartoons, I’d be very happy. I just wish they’d done a little more to mark 200 issues. Heck, come September, this will be DC’s second longest-running comic, after Hellblazer. You’d think that would be worth something.

Rating: 7/10

Young Justice (2011 Series) #4

July 16, 2011 Leave a comment

June 23, 2011

Title: By Hook Or By Web

Writers: Art Baltazar & Franco
Art:
Mike Norton
Colorist:
Zac Atkinson
Letterer:
Carlos M. Mangual
Cover:
Mike Norton & Alex Sinclair
Editors:
Jim Chadwick & Michael McCalister       
Publisher:
DC Comics/Johnny DC

The Black Spider and Hook have captured three of our heroes, but Robin’s got something special up his sleeve. Once he, Kid Flash, and Aqualad bust out, we get what amounts to a slam-bang action issue, as our three heroes tussle with the two villains. The action works very well, with the writers giving each hero a bit of a spotlight, showing off their powers and what sets them apart from their teammates. The villains are somewhat generic, but in truth, they mostly amount to living MacGuffins anyway – important only in that they give the heroes someone to fight and a way to show off what they can do. This is, sadly, Mike Norton’s last issue on this series. It’s a real shame, too – he’s got a perfect style and sensibility for these heroes. He’s long proven himself one of the most dependable and underrated superhero artists in the industry, and while I’m sure he’ll be happy to move on to more high-profile projects, this series is going to miss him.

Rating: 7/10